Space Out stuff

la0

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#1
This space mission wasn't accepted! Its was called Comet Hopper mission!
2015021918073754e62669be86d.jpg
Comet Hopper (CHopper) was a proposed lander to NASA's Discovery Program that, had it been selected, would have orbited and landed multiple times on Comet Wirtanen as it approaches the Sun. The proposed mission is led by Jessica Sunshine of the UMD, working with Lockheed Martin to build the spacecraft and the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center to manage the mission.
The Comet Hopper mission was one of three Discovery Program finalists that received USD$3 million in May 2011 to develop a detailed concept study.The other two missions were InSight and Titan Mare Explorer. After a review in August 2012, NASA selected the InSight mission. Which will be sent to Mars!I done a space out about this InSight long ago!
The CHopper mission has three primary science goals over the 7.3 years of its nominal lifetime. At roughly 4.5 AU the spacecraft will rendezvous with Comet Wirtanen and begin to map the spatial heterogeneity of surface solids as well as gas and dust emissions from the coma - the nebulous envelope around the nucleus of a comet. The remote mapping will also allow for any nucleus structure, geologic processes, and coma mechanisms to be determined. After arriving at Comet Wirtanen, the spacecraft will approach and land, then subsequently hop to other locations on the comet. As the comet approaches the sun, the spacecraft will land and hop multiple times.The final landing will occur at 1.5 AU. As the comet approaches the sun and becomes more active, the spacecraft will be able to record surface changes.
Like the name of the mission it would had hopper around the comet!!!!
Also its power source would a RTG.Solar cell would had been to large!!
2015021918132254e627c29e57a.jpg
 

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rotubirtnoc
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#4
Yes this mission was propose sometime ago! While that ESA probe did land they lost it and can't find it!
Oh man, that sucks... I remember wasn't it something about the screws not firing down to anchor the probe? Anyway, that is a lot of time and money they won't get back.
Hopefully they made at least one discovery or something to help make it worth it.

I thought you would like this: https://twitter.com/Sci_Phile/status/561635150422097921 I thought it was super cool. Infografics are always win.
 

la0

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#5
Oh man, that sucks... I remember wasn't it something about the screws not firing down to anchor the probe? Anyway, that is a lot of time and money they won't get back.
Hopefully they made at least one discovery or something to help make it worth it.

I thought you would like this: https://twitter.com/Sci_Phile/status/561635150422097921 I thought it was super cool. Infografics are always win.
Its did transmit some data until the batteries run down! They should had landed in a place they first wanted too more sunlight for the solar cell.It made had falling down sideways and it solar
cell couldn't recharge the batteries. Or the comatian didn't like us putting junk on their land,they recycle it! LOL!
 

la0

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#6
Saturn! Photo taken by the Cassini space probe
800px-Saturn_from_Cassini_Orbiter_(2007-01-19).jpg Saturn_diagram.svg.png Saturn_Equinox_09212014.jpg Saturn's_A_Ring_From_the_Inside_Out.jpg
6th planet from our Sun,the planet can be view with a good size telescope and it ring system. Saturn is 95 time as massive as the Earth.At one time they though the rings was one massive object.But they discover that each ring system has a different rotation rate.
Saturn has a prominent ring system that consists of nine continuous main rings and three discontinuous arcs, composed mostly of ice particles with a smaller amount of rocky debris and dust. Sixty-two known moons orbit the planet, of which fifty-three are officially named. This does not include the hundreds of "moonlets" comprising the rings. Titan, Saturn's largest and the Solar System's second largest moon, is larger than the planet Mercury and is the only moon in the Solar System to retain a substantial atmosphere.

Saturn's interior is probably composed of a core consisting of iron–nickel and rock (silicon and oxygen compounds), surrounded by a deep layer of metallic hydrogen, an intermediate layer of liquid hydrogen and liquid helium and an outer gaseous layer. The planet exhibits a pale yellow hue due to ammonia crystals in its upper atmosphere. Electrical current within the metallic hydrogen layer is thought to give rise to Saturn's planetary magnetic field, which is weaker than Earth's, but has a magnetic moment 580 times that of Earth due to Saturn's larger body radius. Saturn's magnetic field strength is around one-twentieth the strength of Jupiter's. The outer atmosphere is generally bland and lacking in contrast, although long-lived features can appear. Wind speeds on Saturn can reach 1,800 km/h (500 m/s), faster than on Jupiter, but not as fast as those on Neptune.
Saturn was visited be 3 space probes
Pioneer 11 carried out the first flyby of Saturn in September 1979, when it passed within 20,000 km of the planet's cloud tops. Images were taken of the planet and a few of its moons, although their resolution was too low to discern surface detail. The spacecraft also studied Saturn's rings, revealing the thin F-ring and the fact that dark gaps in the rings are bright when viewed at high phase angle (towards the Sun), meaning that they contain fine light-scattering material. In addition, Pioneer 11 measured the temperature of Titan
Voyager flybys

In November 1980, the Voyager 1 probe visited the Saturn system. It sent back the first high-resolution images of the planet, its rings and satellites. Surface features of various moons were seen for the first time. Voyager 1 performed a close flyby of Titan, increasing knowledge of the atmosphere of the moon. It proved that Titan's atmosphere is impenetrable in visible wavelengths, therefore no surface details were seen. The flyby changed the spacecraft's trajectory out from the plane of the Solar System.

Almost a year later, in August 1981, Voyager 2 continued the study of the Saturn system. More close-up images of Saturn's moons were acquired, as well as evidence of changes in the atmosphere and the rings. Unfortunately, during the flyby, the probe's turnable camera platform stuck for a couple of days and some planned imaging was lost. Saturn's gravity was used to direct the spacecraft's trajectory towards Uranus.

The probes discovered and confirmed several new satellites orbiting near or within the planet's rings, as well as the small Maxwell Gap (a gap within the C Ring) and Keeler gap (a 42 km wide gap in the A Ring).
Cassini–Huygens spacecraft;Cassini is still working and orbiting Saturn
On 1 July 2004, the Cassini–Huygens space probe performed the SOI (Saturn Orbit Insertion) maneuver and entered orbit around Saturn. Before the SOI, Cassini had already studied the system extensively. In June 2004, it had conducted a close flyby of Phoebe, sending back high-resolution images and data.
Cassini's flyby of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has captured radar images of large lakes and their coastlines with numerous islands and mountains. The orbiter completed two Titan flybys before releasing the Huygens probe on 25 December 2004. Huygens descended onto the surface of Titan on 14 January 2005, sending a flood of data during the atmospheric descent and after the landing. Cassini has since conducted multiple flybys of Titan and other icy satellites.
In 2006, NASA reported that Cassini had found evidence of liquid water reservoirs that erupt in geysers on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Images had shown jets of icy particles being emitted into orbit around Saturn from vents in the moon's south polar region. "Other moons in the Solar System have liquid-water oceans covered by kilometers of icy crust. What's different here is that pockets of liquid water may be no more than tens of meters below the surface." Over 100 geysers have been identified on Enceladus. In May 2011, NASA scientists at an Enceladus Focus Group Conference reported that Enceladus "is emerging as the most habitable spot beyond Earth in the Solar System for life as we know it".

Cassini photographs have led to other significant discoveries. They have revealed a previously undiscovered planetary ring, outside the brighter main rings of Saturn and inside the G and E rings. The source of this ring is believed to be the crashing of a meteoroid off two of the moons of Saturn.In July 2006, Cassini images provided evidence of hydrocarbon lakes near Titan's north pole, the presence of which were confirmed in January 2007. In March 2007, additional images near Titan's north pole revealed hydrocarbon seas, the largest of which is almost the size of the Caspian Sea.In October 2006, the probe detected an 8,000 km diameter cyclone-like storm with an eyewall at Saturn's south pole.
 

Vulfen

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#7
so far away, the distance between planets is great, the distance between stars is abismal, the distance between galaxies is unbelievable. Yet we're all stuck here at planet earth. I think that before humans go to any planet it is far more useful to send robots, robots should build an entire new city before any human arrived, supplies should be stocked by robots before any human got to any planet. It is so logical, robots must pave the way.When you think that by looking at a star or galaxy what you are seeing is what happened millions or billions of years ago all seems too crazy. How could aliens counter this? How could they counter also all the distance between galaxies and the time it would take to travel?

:panda-hypnotize:
 

la0

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#8
so far away, the distance between planets is great, the distance between stars is abismal, the distance between galaxies is unbelievable. Yet we're all stuck here at planet earth. I think that before humans go to any planet it is far more useful to send robots, robots should build an entire new city before any human arrived, supplies should be stocked by robots before any human got to any planet. It is so logical, robots must pave the way.When you think that by looking at a star or galaxy what you are seeing is what happened millions or billions of years ago all seems too crazy. How could aliens counter this? How could they counter also all the distance between galaxies and the time it would take to travel?

:panda-hypnotize:
Sf fy show like Star trek made it look easy. If we made to travel the speed of light it would take 4.5 years to make to the nearest star. On star trek they warp space and time making this travel time a few days. A way to look at it we live on the surface of space kind of like on balloon (outer space) but to travel )in space or inside of the balloon you can go faster than light and the most direct route.But to warp space takes lot of power some in our present understanding we can't master,we need to grow up a little more . Again I believe one day we would be able to do it and one day we will have cities on the moon and Mars,we have to or the Earth would be a very heavy population which stand at 9 billion within next 50 year it would be about 27 billion unless we impose some very strict birth control it might be reduce to 19 billion unless some kind of virus happen like on the Walking Dead!!!!I believe other races out there face these problem too. Travel between galaxies would need even more advance race because of boy you look at the nearest large galaxy to our own is about 5 milllion light years. Star trek speed of warp 9 it would take about 300 years unlesst wee learn how to make some wormhole than it would take secs... I sorry for a long essay! Sorry!!!!!
 

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#9
NASA Pluto Probe Begins Search for New Moons, Rings

A NASA spacecraft speeding toward Pluto is casting a wary eye on the dwarf planet system, looking for anything that could trip it up in the home stretch of its historic mission.

NASA's New Horizons probe, which is set to perform the first-ever flyby of Pluto on July 14, has begun hunting for possible rings and undiscovered moons, in an effort to identify potential hazards near the dwarf planet. The campaign began Monday (May 11) and involves roughly weekly observations with the spacecraft's long-range camera through July 1, mission team members said.
pluto-new-horizons-art-2.jpg
New Horizons was the speediest spacecraft ever launched when it blasted off in January 2006, and it's now rocketing along at a healthy 32,570 mph (52,416 km/h) relative to the sun — so fast that a collision with a piece of debris just a few millimeters wide could prove fatal, even though the probe is protected by a Kevlar "bulletproof vest."

So the hazard-hunting team is on the lookout for any regions on or around New Horizons' path that may harbor such debris. That explains why the researchers are concerned about undiscovered moons.

"New moons might be shedding dust into the system, into a place where we can encounter it," said New Horizons science team member John Spencer, also of SwRI, who is leading the hazard search. The odds of actually slamming into a newfound moon are extremely small, he added.

Pluto is known to have five moons: Charon, Nix, Hydra, Kerberos and Styx. Charon, the innermost moon, was first spotted in 1978; at 648 miles (1,043 kilometers) in diameter, it's nearly half as wide as Pluto itself. The other four satellites are all tiny, and were discovered by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope between 2005 and 2012.

Spencer said he wouldn't be surprised if New Horizons did indeed add some more names to this list.
So what will the New Horizons team do if the current search turns up a possible hazard? There are two main options, which could be employed in tandem if need be.



One option is to point New Horizons' high-gain antenna forward, using it like a shield as the probe zooms through a debris field. But the spacecraft's handlers hope to avoid resorting to this strategy.

"That change would hurt our science significantly, because we wouldn't have the freedom to point in all the directions we'd like,
The other option is to change course. Mission team members have mapped out three alternate trajectories, two of which are merely slight adjustments to the nominal one, which takes New Horizons within 7,800 miles (12,500 km) of Pluto's surface. The third route would send New Horizons much closer to the dwarf planet, far inside Charon's orbit.

Shifting to either of the first two alternate trajectories would likely not impact the flyby's science return significantly, Spencer said. But the same is not true of the super-close route.
"If we fly that very close one, we cannot fly the nominal sequence," Spencer said. "We have to fly the sequence that has the antenna pointing forward, because things are just in too much of a different direction than they would be on the nominal sequence."

In addition, photos taken very close to Pluto would probably not be as sharp as those snapped from the nominal trajectory or the two similar alternates.

"Our cameras are designed to work from a certain distance, with things moving at a certain rate of speed through the system," Spencer said. "If you're speeding along a highway," he explained by way of analogy, "it's hard to read the sign on the front of a business that's right next to the road."

If mission team members decide to go with one of the alternate trajectories, New Horizons would likely perform an engine burn 14 days before the July 14 flyby. This maneuver would use little fuel, Spencer said, and probably wouldn't prevent New Horizons from visiting another object beyond Pluto in a potential extended mission (which NASA has not yet approved or funded).
 

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#10
The comet lander Philae surprised scientists when it suddenly woke up and contacted Earth after a seven-month hibernation, the European Space Agency announced Sunday.

Scientists had lost contact with the solar-powered probe after it was dropped on the icy comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by its mothership Rosetta on Nov. 15. Philae's battery ran out at about 60 hours after it landed next to a cliff that largely blocked sunlight from reaching the lander's solar panels.

Scientists had hoped the probe would wake up again as the comet approached the sun, enabling Philae's solar panels to soak up enough light to charge the craft's main battery. But there were fears its mission would be cut short.

Any such fears ended late Saturday, when the European Space Operations Center in Darmstadt, Germany, received signals from the lander.
"I'm not really surprised it happened, but if you wait for several months and then suddenly in the middle of the night you get a call saying, 'We have a signal from Philae,' it's exciting," said Stephan Ulamec, project manager at the German Aerospace Center, or DLR. "We're very happy."

Ulamec said the probe appears to have been awake for several days before it called home, because some of the information packets that the scientists received contained historical data.

A post on the Rosetta blog on the the European Space Agency's website said Philae "spoke" with its team on the ground via Rosetta for 85 seconds in its first contact since November.

The post said during analysis of the status data, it became clear that Philae must have been awake before, and that the scientists are waiting for it to make contact again.
 

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rotubirtnoc
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#11
The comet lander Philae surprised scientists when it suddenly woke up and contacted Earth after a seven-month hibernation, the European Space Agency announced Sunday.

I read this story when it 1st woke up. As soon as the sun hit it I guess those panels charged the batteries enough to resume normal operation. But, this begs the question: will it die again when it cycles further away from the sun in a few months?
 

la0

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#12
I read this story when it 1st woke up. As soon as the sun hit it I guess those panels charged the batteries enough to resume normal operation. But, this begs the question: will it die again when it cycles further away from the sun in a few months?
Yes once it orbit carry the comet away from the Sun unless the comet changes the spin direction that would carry the area where the lander is to where it spend more time in the Sun but this is not to happen.Since the orbit of the comet near gets the comet that close to the sun. Only to about earth orbit just a little more distance.the reason it has such a orbit is because of Jupiter power gravity field.Here is the orbit pic comet_67p_cg_orbit_sm.gif
 

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#16
I recently learned that during the time pluto was considered a planet, it didn't have enough time to make one revolution around the sun.

It makes me sad.
that's one way to look at it, but I never could ignore all the other revolutions it did before the humans even knew pluto existed. What I get sad about is that I did not witness anything that happened in the past, all those revolutions occurred of pluto around the sun without me knowing.... :panda-awkward:
looking at this window of time I am in, although I did not witness anything of the past, it is still mind-boggling to think of so many things that are happening across the galaxies right now and all what happened up until now. In the vastness of space I don't think I could ever get bored of life, not a chance,
I only wish I had more technology,,,,:panda-eating::panda-sparkle-yes:
 
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Reg Charlie Brown 9S Lucas
#19
So the surface of Pluto turned out to be... weird. It had smooth parts... and mountains. Pluto exists in a cloud of comets and debris. The main reason it is no longer considered a planet is because it didn't clear out its orbital path like "real" planets do. In theory that would mean Pluto's surface would still be routinely peppered by comets and it seemingly should've been almost totally covered in impact craters like the moon is. Pluto also shouldn't have any real geological activity so mountains are an oddity.

Hmm, we answer one question only to be faced with a bunch of new ones.
 

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